Tips for Purchasing a Used Recumbent

Tips for Purchasing a Used Recumbent

Almost daily, we get calls asking for help with the purchase of a used recumbent. We’ve seen so many bikes come through our doors that we feel we have a pretty good idea of what constitutes and good and bad investment. Here’s a short video to summarize everything, but I have also listed things to think about below:

That bike that you got for steal can quickly turn into an expensive project if you don’t look at these things:

  • How is the drivetrain? Is the chain rusty? Are the cables and housings rusted?
  • Do the brakes work?
  • Are the wheels true? Are the tires in good condition? New tires can easily add $100-200 to the price of your bike if you have to replace them.
  • Has the bike been crashed? There are generally signs of a crash on the brake levers, handlebars, quick release skewers and rear derailleur. Look closely.
  • Is the frame damaged?
  • Does it fit? Is it comfortable for you? Only a test ride will confirm. Buying used via mail order without asking a lot of questions about sizing and fit is a bad idea.

Hopefully, this list will give you some ideas of what to look for. If buying online, it can also give you a good list of pictures/videos to request so you can see the complete bike and its condition.

Research the bikes you are looking at before you start looking at too many advertisements. Just like any shopping experience, knowing what you want before you spend your money ensures you will enjoy your bike for many years.

1 comment

Hi, I love my Corsa!
One thing though, I have the seat fairly far back and I feel like my hands might slip off the handlebars. Is it OK to reverse the handlebar stem post so the curve angles back? It brings the bars back enough that it feels much more comfortable. I’ve only ridden it on the stationary rollers so I don’t know how it handles on the road. Any suggestions?

Kerry Fenn

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